Time Management

Transitioning from High School to College, and from College to the working world, requires the development of good time management habits. And if there’s one thing being an athlete in college taught me, it was how to properly manage my time. As a baseball player I had 5 games a week in-season, with roughly 6 hours spent at the field each game day. And that’s when we weren’t traveling for a game, which was 50% of the time. My Spring semester was consumed with my sport, but that didn’t mean that school was put on hold. I had to keep up with all of my classes in a challenging academic environment, so I had to teach myself to be disciplined, and not spend my free time away from the field simply catching up on rest.

In a number of ways, this taught me how to deal with the many stresses and tasks of the working world, particularly the following:

Multi-Task. Multi-Tasking is something you have to be able to do in the working world, especially as one of the younger employees of a company. People pull you in a million different directions, and while that can be overwhelming, it’s something you have to learn to deal with. Manage your time based on the priority of each task you’re given. I like to have a core task that I work on for a majority of the day, with many side tasks that I accomplish when I need a break from the main goal. Prioritizing is a major part of multi-tasking as you’ll see ahead…

Prioritize. This is one of the most important aspects of work I’ve learned in my short two years in corporate America. People throw tasks at you all the time. Like I explained in the previous section, it’s smart to have a main goal for a day, or even a week, with your “side tasks” as the items you complete when you need a break. Differentiating between the tasks that NEED to get done urgently and the tasks that can be completed at your leisure can be challenging.  It is not always easy to know what the expectations are unless you ask.  Communicating is crucial to effective prioritization…

Communicate.  Keeping an open communication line with the people that you work with, especially your boss(es), reassures you that you’re working on the appropriate projects at the appropriate times. It helps avoid that anxiety that a lot of young employees experience on a daily basis while wondering what their superiors are thinking, and also shows your co-workers that you care. If you keep this open communication throughout your career, not only will you be successful but it will help you avoid any unnecessary stress from uncertainty…

Avoid Stress. When you have a million tasks thrown at you daily as a young member of a team, and you are not even sure where to begin, it can be extremely overwhelming. Nothing is worse than feeling under water with projects to complete, and the stress will begin to set in. Don’t let it get there. If you manage your time, prioritize tasks, keep an open communication line with your boss and colleagues, and are always on the same page as your team, you will avoid stressing, multi-task to perfection, and meet your deadlines with ease.

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